History - Year 7

In Year 7, students have three lessons a fortnight. Students are taught in form groups.

Students will mostly be completing work on Medieval history, studying different topics each term with assessment tasks linked to them.

Topic  Overview  Assessment 
Introduction to History







Skeleton Mystery 
This topic will introduce students to the basic historical skills that will be used and built upon throughout their time at the County High School, Leftwich.

The students will start by studying chronology through an investigation about 'water through time'.


This will be followed by investigating a skeleton mystery and will follow up by describing various related sources and explaining their ideas about what happened to the skeletons.

Students will also explore different historical concepts such as chronology, interpretations, historical sources, change and continuity and cause and consequence.  
Each topic will be formally assessed on at least 1 of the student tracking (ST) exams throughout the academic year.

Students will complete a written essay about the 'mysterious skeletons' using evidence from clues.

Students will become accustomed to the 'PEEL' structure of writing, which will be used throughout their time study History at the County High School, Leftwich.

Anchored assessment activity: Write your own hypothesis about what happened to the mysterious skeletons (introduction to PEEL writing style).  
Changing Royal Power, 1066-1087  
This unit will focus on an investigation of key aspects of the succession crisis in 1066 and the Norman Conquest.

Two thematic studies will be introduced to accustom students to studying a theme throughout history rather than focussing on a single historical period. This unit focusses on 'changing royal power' and 'migration through time' and will feature:

What makes a good medieval king?
Was it dangerous being a medieval king?
Edward the Confessor.
Who were the contenders to the throne in 1066?
The Battles of Stamford Bridge and Hastings.
William's problems after Hastings.
Migration of Jews to England after 1066.
Domesday Book & Feudalism.
Castles.
English resistance to the Normans.
Impact of the Norman Conquest.
William's obituary.  
ST1 formal assessment (45 minutes). Questions from 'Changing Royal Power, 1066-1087' unit.

The exam is structured using GCSE style command language and will have an exam style mark scheme.

The questions will allow the students to practise GCSE style questions with a focus on the skills of description, explanation, comparison and evaluation.

Students will complete a knowledge test (KT1) based on their learning up to this point.  
Changing Royal Power, 1154-1216 
This unit will focus on and expand the 'changing royal power' theme bringing in factors such as religion and economics.

Plantagenet dynasty.
Role of the medieval church: church vs king.
Henry II and Thomas Becket.
The Crusades and Richard I.
King John and Magna Carta
Changing royal power review.

As a result of studying this topic students will be expanding their skills of comparison. They will also be able to build on their religious knowledge and literacy.  
Knowledge test (KT) focussed on units 1 and 2 'Skeleton Mystery' and 'Changing Royal Power, 1066-1087'.

Anchored assessment: 'Religion was the main reason for changing royal power in the years 1066-1216'. How far do you agree with this statement?  
Changing Royal Power, 1327-1399 
This unit will focus on and expand the 'changing royal power' theme focusing on the fourth factor: individuals.

Henry III, Simon de Montfort and the development of Parliament.
The Black Death.
Richard II and the Peasants' Revolt.
Late-medieval migration & review.

This unit will tie up and review both thematic studies for Year 7 (changing royal power and migration). Students will analyse which factors (money, religion, individuals and wars and rebellions) contributed to changing royal power and which factors contributed most.  
Knowledge test (KT) focussed on all units studied thus far.

ST2 formal assessment (45 minutes).
Questions from 'Changing Royal Power, 1066-1399' units.

The questions will allow the students to practise the skills of description, explanation, comparison and evaluation.  
Medieval Life, Health and Medicine 
This unit will tie in with the GCSE unit 'Britain: Health and the people: c1000 to the present day'.

This unit will focus on the history of 'ordinary' people rather than kings and governments, including overlapping GCSE knowledge and themes. To focus on:

Life in a village.
Life in a town.
Medieval beliefs.
Drunk monks.
Medieval medicine (including an introduction to Hippocratic and Galenic medicine).
Medieval crime and punishment.
Life for women.
How dangerous was medieval life?
Life in medieval England review project.
Renaissance.  
Students will complete a knowledge test (KT3) based on their learning up to this point.

Anchored assessment activity: How useful is Source A for studying life in Medieval England?  

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